A garden for bees

A garden for bees

No matter the size of your garden, there is always a little room to accommodate honey plants, to create a bee-friendly environment.

Bees seek out pollen and nectar: ​​therefore, artificially selected flowers, such as pompom chrysanthemums, are less attractive to those insects who cannot make their way through the petals to find the precious nectar.

Single flowers, with widely spread petals, are the most attractive because bees do not have to strain to reach the nectar. It is for example the bramble, the cherry tree, the clematis… The plants offering inflorescences of multiple small flowers are also very interesting for the bees which can draw a lot of nectar there of a blow, while going from a flower to the other: this is the case with lavender for example.

The best choice for your garden will depend on the location, weather conditions, annual sunshine and temperature.

Local species are best suited to the local wildlife, as they will feed caterpillars and other larvae. In addition, these species are already adapted to the climate and therefore require less care and better survive extreme conditions (cold, humidity, drought, etc.) 

Plants then provide a diverse source of food for our friends the bees. It is always beneficial for wildlife to arrange in their garden, a place where vegetation grows spontaneously. Honey bees will visit wild flowers, butterflies will lay their eggs there, and birds will enjoy their seeds and fruits. 

Ban pesticides that have a deadly effect on bees, damage the soil... We could go on the list at length...

Some plants adapted to the gardens of Europe

In the asteraceae (daisy) family: cosmos, chicory, blue thistle...

Fleur Cosmos

Cosmos

In the borage family: borage, viperine

fleur bourrache

Borage

In the primulaceae family: primroses

primevere

Primroses

In the Malvaceae family: hollyhocks or mauves

Rose trémière

Hollyhocks